Term of the Week: Taxonomy

What is it?

A hierarchical classification scheme made up of categories and subcategories of information plus a controlled vocabulary of terms, usually used to describe a specific area of knowledge.

Why is it important?

Provides meaningful organization for the content, as well as metadata, both of which support dynamic behavior such as searching, browsing, and related associations.

Why does a content strategist need to know this?

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Term of the Week: Content Scorecard

What is it?

A content assessment tool used to evaluate content against specific criteria and user scenarios. Ratings are assigned to each criterion and are presented as a scorecard.

Why is it important?

Provides insights about content strengths, weaknesses, and priorities. The scorecard approach quantifies and communicates qualitative data to stakeholders in an engaging and persuasive way.

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Term of the Week: Content Model

What is it?

A formal representation of structured content as a collection of content types and their interrelationships.

Why is it important?

Provides a shared vocabulary for content that communicates its essential structure and meaning, making it easier to execute a content strategy.

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Term of the Week: Content Flow

What is it?

A mapping of content from the input source to its multiple outputs. Works in conjunction with content models and content types.

Why is it important?

Provides a clear visualization to support technical implementation within a CMS of the business rules described by the content model.

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Term of the Week: Content Type

What is it?

A specification for a structured, standardized, reusable, and mutually exclusive kind of information entity.

Why is it important?

Helps developers program for content functionality within a content management system (CMS), acts as the raw foundation for content templates, and aids in the construction of a content model that governs content architecture and use.

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Term of the Week: Content Matrix

What is it?

An expansion of the content inventory to track the progress of each piece of content through the stages of a project or content lifecycle.

Why is it important?

Allows for at-a-glance tracking of content states, behaviors, locations, and connections. Done well, the matrix can be sorted by various criteria for analysis.

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Term of the Week: Content Analysis

What is it?

The process and result of conducting a qualitative study of content. It ascertains quality of content against objective quality benchmarks.

Why is it important?

Determines the state of content for scoping migration or rework efforts, identifying which content can be migrated or used “as is” and which content needs editing, rewriting, or restructuring.

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Term of the Week: Content Audit

What is it?

The process and result of conducting a quantitative study of a content inventory.

Why is it important?

Ascertains potential of content in areas such as content on high-traffic web pages, legally required content, types of content by content type, and so on. Allows for prioritization of content for project planning.

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Term of the Week: Content Inventory

What is it?

The process and result of creating an organized listing of content assets (text, files, audio, video, images) for a body of content. An inventory includes as much information about each piece of content as possible.

Why is it important?

Creates a current-state baseline, which helps to define scope and identify issues for further analysis.

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Term of the Week: Requirements Matrix

What is it?

A tool for assessing content priorities against defined business needs, where prioritized business goals and requirements are mapped against an organization’s content.

Why is it important?

Aligns content to agreed business goals, meaning content decisions are prioritized without politics. Content is transformed into a business asset: measurable, auditable, and with a defined return on investment.

Why does a content strategist need to know this?

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