Term of the Week: Modular Content

What is it?

A form of structured content that is designed, created, and delivered as discrete components within the content whole. 

Why is it important?

Enables device-independent delivery in multiple contexts, at multiple levels of detail, and with varying consumer focus. It allows the content strategist to meet today’s delivery challenges and prepare for tomorrow’s unknowns.

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Term of the Week: Content Reuse

What is it?

The practice of using content components in multiple information products.

Why is it important?

Developing reusable content that can be used in multiple places and output formats saves valuable resources, enforces consistency, and improves content quality and effectiveness.

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Term of the Week: XML

What is it?

Extensible Markup Language (XML) is an open standard for structured information storage and exchange.

Why is it important?

Encodes content and content structure, which in turn allows for machine-driven filtering and formatting of information. XML also serves as an interchange layer among otherwise incompatible systems.

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Term of the Week: Structured Content

What is it?

Content, whether in a textual, visual, or playable format, that conforms to structural and semantic rules that allow machine processing to meet specific business requirements.

Why is it important?

Humans are much better than computers when it comes to understanding the nuances of content. Structuring content with semantic metadata allows computers to understand the content’s relationship to business processes. This enables better discovery, marketing, and user engagement. 

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Term of the Week: Single Sourcing

What is it?

The ability to create content once, planning for its reuse in multiple places, contexts, and output channels.

Why is it important?

Leverages content to its fullest potential, with benefits such as increased consistency and accuracy and reduced development time.

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Term of the Week: Taxonomy

What is it?

A hierarchical classification scheme made up of categories and subcategories of information plus a controlled vocabulary of terms, usually used to describe a specific area of knowledge.

Why is it important?

Provides meaningful organization for the content, as well as metadata, both of which support dynamic behavior such as searching, browsing, and related associations.

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Term of the Week: Content Scorecard

What is it?

A content assessment tool used to evaluate content against specific criteria and user scenarios. Ratings are assigned to each criterion and are presented as a scorecard.

Why is it important?

Provides insights about content strengths, weaknesses, and priorities. The scorecard approach quantifies and communicates qualitative data to stakeholders in an engaging and persuasive way.

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Term of the Week: Content Model

What is it?

A formal representation of structured content as a collection of content types and their interrelationships.

Why is it important?

Provides a shared vocabulary for content that communicates its essential structure and meaning, making it easier to execute a content strategy.

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Term of the Week: Content Flow

What is it?

A mapping of content from the input source to its multiple outputs. Works in conjunction with content models and content types.

Why is it important?

Provides a clear visualization to support technical implementation within a CMS of the business rules described by the content model.

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Term of the Week: Content Type

What is it?

A specification for a structured, standardized, reusable, and mutually exclusive kind of information entity.

Why is it important?

Helps developers program for content functionality within a content management system (CMS), acts as the raw foundation for content templates, and aids in the construction of a content model that governs content architecture and use.

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